Sustaining our Traditions and Culture
Sustaining our Traditions and Culture
Tulalip Natural Resources Department image of near Tulalip estuary and uplands with urban development encroachment
Whale
Sustaining our Traditions and Culture
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Clams and Oysters

Clams and oysters are harvested primarily for ceremonial and subsistence purposes only. The subsistence clam fishery is monitored through a permit system coupled with beach monitoring and patrols. Subsistence clam permits allows for a maximum landing of 75 pounds of clams and each tribal member is allowed a maximum of five permits each year. The volume of harvest and frequency of opportunity limits have been established to supply all Tulalip tribal members with equal opportunities and to separate the fishery from commercial volumes. Beginning in 1991, all landings have been tracked and monitored by the specific beach the harvester has requested access to support beach specific population monitoring and to assess harvest pressure per beach location. The Tulalip Shellfish Program conducts population assessments for clams on several beaches every year. Examples of locations of past surveys are Camano Head (private tidelands), Camano Island State Park (public), Tulalip Tribes’ reservation (private), Baby Island (private), and Hat Island (private). The Shellfish Program has also been involved in clam and oyster enhancement on selected Tulalip owned beaches for augmentation, enhancement, research and restoration purposes.

Tulalip Natural Resources Department line art image of forest or wetland area